GL1200 Bobber Seat

by

GL1200 Bobber Seat

I showed earlier how I cut out and pounded out a seat pan and mounting system for the Goldwing GL1200 bobber.  I’m finally at the point where I could go ahead and foam and cover the seat pan with leather.  With thin seats like this one is, I truly believe that the shape of the pan makes a lot more difference in comfort than what kind or thickness of foam is used.  I was actually debating whether to even use foam at all.  The use of foam won out in the end and after purchasing some foam, leather, and contact cement I went to covering the seat pan.

First thing was to remove the pan from the bike and trace and cut out the upper and lower leather sections.

IMG_2279

 

I made sure to have at least a couple inches all the way around of extra leather to have enough leather to work with as I stretched it over the foam.  I use good contact cement to glue everything into place.  I do two or three layers letting each layer dry in between applications.  Here is the pan with the foam glued into place and trimmed.

image

image

image

I then marked and cut out the lower panel of leather to fit around the lower mounting brackets.  I scuffed the heck out of the powder coating on the underside for the contact cement to have something to hold onto.  It’s always strange taking a 3″ disc grinder to a perfectly good powder coated surface.  If that isn’t done the contact cement just lifts off the smooth surface and does no good.

image

 

Here the lower leather panel is glued into place.

image

 

The next step is to wet the upper leather panel with some hot water, put into place and begin the molding process of stretching it over the foam.  I don’t usually use any glue at this point because I want to make sure I have the best fit possible before permanently attaching the two halves of leather together.  I just use my palms to push and stretch the leather over the form.  The leather is pretty soft at this point so you have to be careful not to scratch or dent it.  It doesn’t take much time before the leather is molded into a good shape over the foamed pan.

image

 

I use some paint sticks top and bottom and C-clamps to hold things in place while the leather dries.

 

image

 

Once the leather has dried, I go back and start laying down multiple layers of contact cement and then carefully put it all back together.  I use a mallet and smooth faced hammer to carefully pound the mating surfaces together.  At this point I wet all the surfaces and carefully work around the shape of the pan to mate the leather in the best possible shape.  My mason hammer works really good for this step.

IMG_2394

 

I dropped off what I have up to this point at a cobbler here locally to stitch and trim the leather.  I was thinking about stitching it myself but decided I would rather work on getting things buttoned up with the rest of the bike so once the seat is done I will be ready to roll.